Ukrainian Language Learning

Добрий день!

We are about 3/4 of the way through our pre-service training with Peace Corps. The weather is turning to fall, we have our site placement, and the Ukrainian language is really difficult. Ukraine has a mixture of languages, those being Ukrainian, Russian, and Surzhyk (a blending of the two languages). Russian is spoken primarily in the cities, and in the south and east of the country. The community in which we will be working speaks classical Ukrainian.

Language learning is the catalyst for so much of our success in Ukraine. This, however, is probably the most difficult part of our training. We have about 4 hours per day of language classes with our cluster, then we are able to practice with our host families and in public. Nevertheless, learning is slow for both of us.

A few of our milestones with language are ordering food in a cafe/restaurant, shopping at the bazaar, being able to ask for directions (not that we can totally understand directions once they’re given, though), and being able to talk about where we live (both our cities and our homes).

Forming sentences

An activity for the creation of sentences using “to go” and prepositions.

As native English speakers, part of what makes Ukrainian difficult for us, in addition to the new alphabet (our names: кріс і джессіка старберд) and pronunciation patterns, is the concept of cases. The Ukrainian language has 7 cases, which means that words change, depending on how they are being used, into 7 variations of that 1 word.

For example: школа (school), can also be школі, школу, школи, depending on the sentence around it. This applies to pretty much all nouns, and adjectives, and adverbs, (and prepositions?) which also change depending on singular/plural and gender (masculine, feminine, neutral).

This is in addition to the other manners in which words change, for example, tenses of verbs or to move from singular nouns to plural.

Also, like English, even given this grammatical framework, there are even still exceptions with some words.

We are however comforted to know that we both will have some English speaking co-workers. This will go a long way in helping us to have a smooth transition into our respective jobs.

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Just a few questions in Ukrainian to answer in language class