First Impressions

We have been in Ukraine now for a couple weeks. Upon arrival in country we spent the first week in Irpin, learning the basics of Peace Corps service in Ukraine, then moved in to our homes for the next 2 months with our host families in Zhytomyr. While we are still in the adjustment period, there are a few things that have struck us in our limited time here.

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A walk in the park

  1. The Ukrainian people we have met are tremendously positive and proud of their country and their home cities. The people are working to move forward to make their country and cities even better. This is where Peace Corps comes in, to provide support in that process.
  2. There is a very high sense of hospitality in Ukraine. We are both spending time living with separate host families. When we come home from a long day of training, we are each offered an array of sweets, coffee, tea, or an entire meal.
  3. For TEFL project in Ukraine, it is stressed to us by Peace Corps staff that we are not present here solely to be native-speaking English teachers. Ukraine does not lack good, well-educated teachers, they are well trained in universities across the country. We are here to model student-centered approaches, differentiation, and the integration of confidence and critical thinking skills, as well as to help with the implementation of a massive reform, the New Ukrainian Schools, which began September 1.
  4. Meanwhile, the Community Development project methods in Ukraine have just been revamped and our group is the first to use this new format. There is a lot of emphasis on relationship building and communicating organizational/technical skills in a more simple manner (i.e. strip away the business jargon). Furthermore, in order to provide sustainable change, volunteers will work with their assigned organization to co-facilitate, co-train, co-create, etc. The idea is that Peace Corps is not here to dictate what should be done differently, rather working with Ukrainians to improve what they already have.
  5. Ukraine is going through a lot of changes right now. As a result of the revolution in 2014, there is an ongoing overhaul of federal, oblast, and municipal governments. The big idea is that the government is in the process of decentralizing many services and operations (something us Americans take for granted; can you imagine having to go to the federal government to get a drivers license?) The goal of this process to give more power to local governments.

For now, our days are spent learning Ukrainian for 4 hours, then another few hours of technical training and practicums. These are some long days, but we’re tough. More on that later…

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